Tag Archives: DR field

Shifting the Central Paradigm to Dispute System Design

There is no good definition of ADR, as described in a recent post. This post suggests that it’s time for a paradigm shift in our field.  Instead of identifying our field as ADR, we should use dispute system design (DSD) as our central theoretical framework. Time for a Paradigm Shift Thomas S. Kuhn’s classic book, … Continue reading Shifting the Central Paradigm to Dispute System Design

How Do You Want to Improve Dispute Resolution?

The January 2022 issue of Dispute Resolution Magazine includes results of a survey of past contributors about the dispute resolution field.  One question asked about cases, statutes, regulations, or standards of practice that had the biggest impact on the field, and another question asked about changes in case law, statute, or rule they would like … Continue reading How Do You Want to Improve Dispute Resolution?

The Legal Profession, Judiciary, and Dispute Resolution

The January 2022 issue of Dispute Resolution Magazine reports results of a survey of past contributors conducted by Editorial Board co-chairs Andrea Schneider and Michael Moffitt. This post uses some of the survey responses to suggest that we recognize the legal profession and judiciary as part of the dispute resolution field. “Alternative” No More In … Continue reading The Legal Profession, Judiciary, and Dispute Resolution

Assessment of the Dispute Resolution Field

The January 2022 issue of Dispute Resolution Magazine contains a valuable assessment of the dispute resolution field based on a survey of past Magazine contributors.  Andrea Schneider and Michael Moffitt, co-chairs of the Editorial Board, asked them: what they valued about the ABA Section of Dispute Resolution what they wished they had known when they … Continue reading Assessment of the Dispute Resolution Field

If You Had Only One Hour to Describe ADR, What Would You Say?

This was the question I had to answer when planning a lecture.  I was a speaker in a course offered by the Universidad Monteavila in Caracas, Venezuela.  My wonderful colleague, Rafael Gely, organized this collaboration with Missouri’s DR Center to provide a series of speakers, including me. My Venezuelan colleague told me that I could … Continue reading If You Had Only One Hour to Describe ADR, What Would You Say?

ADR’s Place in Navigating a Polarized Era

In the middle of the impeachment trial last week, I received a Westlaw email with links to the symposium on ADR’s Place in Navigating a Polarized Era, organized by Texas A&M and published in the Ohio State Journal of Dispute Resolution. The symposium could not be more timely and is well worth reading (though the … Continue reading ADR’s Place in Navigating a Polarized Era

ADR Diversity Panel for Students TOMORROW, November 19

From PFOI Robyn Weinstein: The Brooklyn Law School Student Organizations OUTLaws and APALSA are hosting a free ADR Diversity Panel tomorrow, November 19, 2020 from 12:40 pm – 1:50 pm. The purpose of this panel is to provide insight for future practicing attorneys on how to begin, develop, and thrive in the ADR field. Specifically, … Continue reading ADR Diversity Panel for Students TOMORROW, November 19

(Some of) My Favorite Resources

In its monthly newsletter, the Resolution Systems Institute (RSI) publishes interviews with various people about their “favorite resources.”  The March 2020 issue includes the following interview of me.  As you will see, I describe a number of resources reflecting my bias for those I developed.  This is only a sample of valuable resources in our … Continue reading (Some of) My Favorite Resources

Here’s Your Theory-of-Change Book

Your wait for the Theory-of-Change book is over.  I just posted this priceless volume, Theories of Change for the Dispute Resolution Movement: Actionable Ideas to Revitalize Our Movement.  It’s all yours, absolutely free!  Just click here to get your copy. For regular readers of this blog, most – but not all – of the pieces … Continue reading Here’s Your Theory-of-Change Book

Theory of Change Symposium – Part 4

This part of the symposium includes several pieces focusing on key skills in legal and dispute resolution practice.  Lisa Amsler highlights the importance of interpersonal and process skills as technology is radically changing legal practice.  Russ Bleemer identifies deficiencies in mediators’ listening behaviors as mediation practice becomes routinized, and he encourages mediators to keep focusing … Continue reading Theory of Change Symposium – Part 4