Tag Archives: mediation

How Mediators Can Solve Tough Problems in Mediation

In a recent presentation to mediators in Michigan, I asked the audience to describe what was frustrating in their mediations.  They often struggle when lawyers and parties are not prepared when they go to mediation, have unrealistic expectations, and act very emotionally. Their reactions prompted me to write this short article in the Michigan Dispute … Continue reading How Mediators Can Solve Tough Problems in Mediation

ABA Dispute Resolution Mediation Institute on Nov 4-6

From Jen Michel: Dear colleagues, Please forgive me for a brief e-introduction in this now-virtual world.  My name is Jennifer Michel and I am the new director of the ABA Section of Dispute Resolution.  I look forward to our paths crossing in the near future. I am also reaching out to share information regarding the … Continue reading ABA Dispute Resolution Mediation Institute on Nov 4-6

The Role of Law in Legal Disputes

Law school teaches students that law is a seamless web of rules emanating from authorities like statutes and cases which they must memorize and finely parse in hypothetical cases. In real life, practitioners generally think of law in terms of Oliver Wendell Holmes’s famous definition:  “prophecies of what the courts will do in fact.” Of … Continue reading The Role of Law in Legal Disputes

Teaching Students to Think Like Practitioners

People often say that dispute resolution processes aren’t “one size fits all.”  When practitioners are asked to opine about hypothetical problems, they often say “it depends” and they make “case by case” decisions. They are telling the truth.  Lawyers make complex decisions as negotiators, litigation advocates, and mediators based on a lot of factors, so … Continue reading Teaching Students to Think Like Practitioners

Three New ABA Books Hot Off the Press!

The ABA Section of Dispute Resolution published three books this year that you, your colleagues, and your students might be interested in. Mediating Legal Disputes: Effective Techniques to Resolve Cases, Second Edition, by Dwight Golann. Psychology for Lawyers: Understanding the Human Factors in Negotiation, Litigation, and Decision Making, Second Edition, by Jennifer K. Robbennolt and … Continue reading Three New ABA Books Hot Off the Press!

Charting a Middle Course for Court-Connected Mediation

The majority opinion in the Breslin case led me to write my piece, Courts Should Make Mediation Good Samaritans Not Frankensteins, which led the CPR Mediation Committee to sponsor a program, Consequences of Not Participating in Court Ordered Mediation:  What Is Fair?  I was one of the speakers, along with Lauren A. Jones, ADR Coordinator … Continue reading Charting a Middle Course for Court-Connected Mediation

Reconciling Allegedly Alternative Mediation Models by Using DIY Models

Like it or not, facilitative and evaluative mediation are part of the social reality of our field.  Despite the fact that these models are misleading and provide counterproductive concepts to guide mediators’ behaviors and set parties’ expectations, they are inescapable.  They are standard elements in texts, courses, trainings, and general discourse in our field.  They … Continue reading Reconciling Allegedly Alternative Mediation Models by Using DIY Models

If You Had Only One Hour to Describe ADR, What Would You Say?

This was the question I had to answer when planning a lecture.  I was a speaker in a course offered by the Universidad Monteavila in Caracas, Venezuela.  My wonderful colleague, Rafael Gely, organized this collaboration with Missouri’s DR Center to provide a series of speakers, including me. My Venezuelan colleague told me that I could … Continue reading If You Had Only One Hour to Describe ADR, What Would You Say?

Proposal for Standard Explanation in Mediation

Since writing my recent short article, Courts Should Make Mediations Good Samaritans Not Frankensteins, I have been thinking about how to maximize the substantial benefits of court-connected mediation while minimizing the risks of coercion. Most mediators, mediation program administrators, and courts are conscientious about providing appropriate, high-quality mediation services.  Unfortunately, with some frequency, there have … Continue reading Proposal for Standard Explanation in Mediation

Dwight Golann on a Year of Zoom Mediations

Dwight Golann just wrote a nice article about mediators’ experiences mediating on Zoom: “I Sometimes Catch Myself Looking Angry or Tired …”  The Impact of Mediating by Zoom, published in CPR’s Alternatives to the High Cost of Litigation. Dwight solicited mediators’ reactions on the International Academy of Mediators listserv as well as in two focus … Continue reading Dwight Golann on a Year of Zoom Mediations

Courts Should Make Mediations Good Samaritans Not Frankensteins

Here’s a short article you might be interested in. Using a recent California appellate decision as a jumping off point, it identifies problems with mandatory mediation and recommends that courts use good dispute system design procedures to reduce risks of creating Frankensteins – mediation that produces injustices.  Of course, some courts have policies fulfilling the … Continue reading Courts Should Make Mediations Good Samaritans Not Frankensteins

Paul M. Lurie on Guided Mediation

Paul M. Lurie, now a retired partner at Schiff Hardin LLP, in 2013 created the Guided Choice Interest Group and its website.  It established what is now known as the Guided Mediation, which was originally called Guided Choice Mediation.  Here’s his description of the current process.   Guided Mediation is a collection of best practices … Continue reading Paul M. Lurie on Guided Mediation