Tag Archives: dealing with the crisis

Evolution of New Normals in Dispute Resolution

On April 1, the Stetson Law Review sponsored an excellent symposium, Is Remote Justice Still Justice?  It featured FOUR (!) Indisputably bloggers (Cynthia Alkon, Sarah Cole, Jill Gross, and Andrea Schneider) as well as Erin Archerd, Deborah Eisenberg, Elayne Greenberg, Nicole lannarone, and Kelly Browe Olson.  Speakers focused on dispute resolution in various contexts including … Continue reading Evolution of New Normals in Dispute Resolution

More Covid PIEs and the Alice-in-Wonderland Supreme Court Decision Endangering Workers

This is a sequel to my post last week, My Covid Perceived Injurious Experiences (PIE).  It describes more PIEs and critiques the Supreme Court’s ghastly decision blocking implementation of the OSHA regulation protecting employees of large employers. I wanted to publish my post last week to express perspectives that a lot of people share and … Continue reading More Covid PIEs and the Alice-in-Wonderland Supreme Court Decision Endangering Workers

Dwight Golann on a Year of Zoom Mediations

Dwight Golann just wrote a nice article about mediators’ experiences mediating on Zoom: “I Sometimes Catch Myself Looking Angry or Tired …”  The Impact of Mediating by Zoom, published in CPR’s Alternatives to the High Cost of Litigation. Dwight solicited mediators’ reactions on the International Academy of Mediators listserv as well as in two focus … Continue reading Dwight Golann on a Year of Zoom Mediations

ABA Section of Dispute Resolution Conference – April 14-17, 2021

From the ABA Section of Dispute Resolution: The 23rd Annual Section of Dispute Resolution Spring Conference will take place on April 14 – 17, 2021 in Los Angeles and online. The 2021 Section of Dispute Resolution Annual Spring Conference will continue our tradition of excellent and innovative educational programs along with social and networking events.  … Continue reading ABA Section of Dispute Resolution Conference – April 14-17, 2021

Asynchronous Instruction in This Year of Living Dangerously

Probably every student and instructor has had difficult challenges this year accommodating to the routines needed because of the pandemic. Many faculty have been teaching fully or partially online and will continue to do so next semester because the virus is still way out of control in the US. Although using video has some advantages, … Continue reading Asynchronous Instruction in This Year of Living Dangerously

Consider Cooking Up Stone Soup in the Fall – Especially in Clinical and Externship Courses

During the summer, faculty plan their courses for the fall. This is a good time to consider including Stone Soup assignments in your courses, especially clinical and externship courses. Faculty who used Stone Soup assignments found that they and their students almost invariably were very enthusiastic, feeling that this was a valuable contribution to students’ … Continue reading Consider Cooking Up Stone Soup in the Fall – Especially in Clinical and Externship Courses

How Many People Will Preventably Die or Get Ill if Universities Hold Classes in Person? – Part 2

This builds on a previous post discussing problems with plans to teach in-person classes in the fall. Most of this post reproduces a listserv message from TFOI Ben Davis expressing concern about universities’ plans for the fall semester. Like Ben, I am very alarmed about universities’ plans to hold classes in person considering how the … Continue reading How Many People Will Preventably Die or Get Ill if Universities Hold Classes in Person? – Part 2

How Many People Will Preventably Die or Get Ill if Universities Hold Classes in Person? – Part 1

This fall, American universities will face their modern rendezvous with destiny as they make momentous decisions whether to protect large communities from death and disease.  Most universities plan to conduct in-person classes and are likely to become semester-long virus incubators if they stick to those plans. The situation would be very different if all government … Continue reading How Many People Will Preventably Die or Get Ill if Universities Hold Classes in Person? – Part 1

Kristen Blankley: New Opportunities for Pro Bono in a Pandemic

From TFOI Kristen Blankley: COVID-19 has created additional need for legal services in many areas, including housing, consumer law, employment law, probate, family law, domestic violence advocacy, criminal law, among others. We all have substantive and process expertise in different areas, which means that we should have a great ability to fulfill our aspirational (or, … Continue reading Kristen Blankley: New Opportunities for Pro Bono in a Pandemic