All posts by John Lande

The Pleasure of Your Company is Requested at the AALS Meeting

From GFOI Jim Alfini: Dear Colleagues: I am writing to solicit your interest in having a get-together at 11:00 am on Friday, January 8, at Cardozo Law School.  The purpose of this meeting is to give those of us who teach dispute resolution courses and are attending the AALS meetings (or reside within reasonable traveling … Continue reading The Pleasure of Your Company is Requested at the AALS Meeting

Another View of the New FRCP Rules

I recently posted an item citing the IAALS’s work touting the benefits of the new amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. For a counterpoint, here’s a draft article by SMU Professor Elizabeth G. Thornburg, Cognitive Bias, the ‘Band of Experts,’ and the Anti-Litigation Narrative.  Here’s the abstract: In December of 2015, yet another … Continue reading Another View of the New FRCP Rules

FRCP Amendments Intended to Change Culture of Litigation

On December 1, amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure will take effect which are intended to change the culture of litigation. According to a post on the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System (IAALS) blog, the new rules affect “judicial case management, disclosure, use of experts, and education for judges.” … Continue reading FRCP Amendments Intended to Change Culture of Litigation

Video and Powerpoints from Fabulous St. Thomas DSD Symposium

As I mentioned in a recent post, the University of St. Thomas Law School held a terrific symposium on November 13, entitled Dispute System Design: Justice, Accountability and Impact. They have posted a video of the symposium as well as powerpoints from most of the presentations. Kudos to Mariana Hernandez Crespo, Heidi Van De Berg, … Continue reading Video and Powerpoints from Fabulous St. Thomas DSD Symposium

BATNA, MLATNA – No Big Difference, Right?

This is the next installment in my too-many-part series, Everything You Know About Dispute Resolution is Wrong. Today’s episode was prompted by Michael’s post about an article in the Chronicle of Higher Education in which the author describes her strategy of improving her BATNA to escape a crappy job as a non-tenure-track instructor.  Michael suggested … Continue reading BATNA, MLATNA – No Big Difference, Right?

Why and How Corporations Use PEDR – Preliminary Findings

On Friday, I was honored to join the all-star cast – including keynoter Lisa Blomgren Amsler, Jackie Font-Guzmán, Susan Franck, Tim Hedeen, Mariana Hernandez Crespo, Jan Martinez, Jackie Nolan-Haley, Jen Reynolds, Colin Rule, Andrea Schneider, Nancy Welsh, and Maureen Weston – at St. Thomas Law School’s Symposium, Dispute System Design: Justice, Accountability and Impact. I … Continue reading Why and How Corporations Use PEDR – Preliminary Findings

How Can We Help in Major Social Conflicts, if at All?

I have gotten emails from dispute resolution colleagues asking what we, in Missouri’s dispute resolution center, might do (or might have done) to help manage the conflict at our university more constructively. For years, some folks in our DR community have noted despairingly that we aren’t engaged in major conflicts like the one that has … Continue reading How Can We Help in Major Social Conflicts, if at All?

Problems with the New York Times Series on Arbitration

Noam Ebner posted a comment on the DRLE listserv about the recent series of articles in the New York Times about arbitration.  I wrote the following comment, in part, responding to his.  I am reproducing his comment with his permission.   In my comments below, I added a paragraph which wasn’t in my listserv comment, about … Continue reading Problems with the New York Times Series on Arbitration

PEDR is Important for Culture Change in Courts

As you may know, the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System (IAALS), is a “national, independent research center dedicated to facilitating continuous improvement and advancing excellence in the American legal system.”  It is an impressive, high-powered organization based in the University of Denver. It has four major initiatives:  (1) Quality Judges (promoting … Continue reading PEDR is Important for Culture Change in Courts