Tag Archives: for teachers and students

How Can You Get a Piece of the Action?

In a series of posts, I described significant problems with the traditional negotiation paradigm of two coherent models, positional and interest-based negotiation (or other labels for essentially the same models). This paradigm has been helpful in moving us forward in recent decades. But simply saying that something was a interest-based or positional negotiation not only … Continue reading How Can You Get a Piece of the Action?

Conflict Resolution Quarterly Call for Papers

Here’s a call for papers from Susan Raines (Kennesaw State), the editor-in-chief of the Conflict Resolution Quarterly (CRQ). CRQ focuses on the role of the neutral in conflict resolution, the processes of conflict resolution, and the causes/cures of conflict at every level from the interpersonal to the international. Our journal prides itself on the importance … Continue reading Conflict Resolution Quarterly Call for Papers

Was the Mitchell-Hamline Negotiation a “Win-Win”?

As Art reported, William Mitchell and Hamline Law Schools plan to merge. Best wishes to all our friends at both schools. Both have wonderful DR colleagues and have been great innovators in legal education. Hopefully, people there will like the new arrangements. Of course, even positive change can be stressful and some people may not … Continue reading Was the Mitchell-Hamline Negotiation a “Win-Win”?

We Need a Better Consensus about Negotiation Theory

In previous posts, I argued that there are serious problems with the general consensus on negotiation theory reflected most clearly in Getting to Yes. I described problems with the system of negotiation models, which assumes that most or all negotiations can fit into two models of highly-correlated variables (or a few variations of these models). … Continue reading We Need a Better Consensus about Negotiation Theory

Problems with the System of Negotiation Models, Part 2

In Part 1, I argued that there are fundamental problems with the system of negotiation models. In this part, I describe actual negotiation cases from my study to illustrate the problems. As you read about them, consider that I am now focusing primarily on problems with descriptive theory – basically a kind of language enabling … Continue reading Problems with the System of Negotiation Models, Part 2

Oldies But Goodies

SSRN subscribers will soon see a passel of my old articles scrolling across their screens and may wonder, “What the heck?” The heck is that, thanks to a new scanner, I was able to make nice pdf files of some articles I wrote before I started posting pieces on SSRN. With the benefit of hindsight, … Continue reading Oldies But Goodies

Problems with the System of Negotiation Models, Part 1

Based on my study of lawyers’ actual negotiations, A Framework for Advancing Negotiation Theory: Implications from a Study of How Lawyers Reach Agreement in Pretrial Litigation, I have reluctantly concluded that the generally-accepted understanding of negotiation theory is seriously flawed and that we need a better theory. The current framework relies primarily on two models … Continue reading Problems with the System of Negotiation Models, Part 1

Global Cyber-Conference on Dispute Resolution

Brian Jarrett (Alaska-Fairbanks Program on Dispute Resolution, Peace-Building, and Restorative Practices) is organizing the Fifth Annual Global Cyber-Conference on Dispute Resolution, which will take place on Wednesday, April 15, from 3 pm to 5:30 pm, Eastern Time. The conference theme is inter-cultural conflict with a particular emphasis on indigenous conflict resolution. The keynote speaker will … Continue reading Global Cyber-Conference on Dispute Resolution