Tag Archives: for teachers and students

My Last Lecture in Your Course

For the first time since 2004, this fall, I will not teach our required 1L course, Lawyering: Problem-Solving and Dispute Resolution. We had several sections each year and so I had a chance to impart my views about lawyering to a substantial part of our class.  I felt passionate about the value of good lawyering … Continue reading My Last Lecture in Your Course

Damn Emotions!

Have you seen “Inside Out” yet? It’s the delightful Pixar movie portraying the conflicting emotions of an 11 year-old girl grappling with the difficulties of a move from Minnesota to San Francisco. Indeed, the emotions are characters themselves:  Anger, Disgust, Fear, Sadness, and Joy. The film’s producers consulted psychologists who wrote a piece in the … Continue reading Damn Emotions!

Failure to Communicate

It’s a damn miracle that people on your planet ever understand each other. My good friend, Charlie Irvine, who mediates and teaches in Glasgow, Scotland, wrote an amusing and/or horrifying blog post about students’ statements in law school exam answers. (Charlie blogs on the Kluwer Mediation Blog, which has some very thoughtful contributors. I saw … Continue reading Failure to Communicate

Great Value of Students Playing Clients in Multi-Stage Simulations

If you are sick and tired of hearing me sing the praises of multi-stage simulations (MSS) and don’t want to see any data about it, read no further. Some Background Before I start singing, let me provide some background. I started using MSSs when I began teaching negotiation several years ago.  Related to my research … Continue reading Great Value of Students Playing Clients in Multi-Stage Simulations

Shocking News: I’m Enjoying Grading

You may have heard the instructor’s line that he would teach for free – but he gets paid to grade. I suspect that for most faculty, grading is one of their least favorite activities. It’s right up there with chairing committees, root canal surgery, and watching 1000s of nasty campaign ads right before an election. … Continue reading Shocking News: I’m Enjoying Grading

Why We Write

Our own Sarah Cole, Jill Gross, and Andrea Schneider, along with Tim Hedeen and Nancy Welsh, led an excellent session at the ABA conference entitled, “How Being Angry Leads to Good Research.” They said that perceptions of “injustice, bias, discrimination and wrongdoing” have motivated them and others to do valuable research.  Jean Sternlight, when accepting … Continue reading Why We Write

Everything I Know About Dispute Resolution is Wrong – Especially What You Say About It

I think that it is accurate to say that at the ABA DR Section Conference we had a lively session entitled, “Everything You Know About Dispute Resolution is Wrong – Can You Handle the Truth?” (At least it was lively for those who were able to squeeze into the room and not for the people … Continue reading Everything I Know About Dispute Resolution is Wrong – Especially What You Say About It