All posts by John Lande

Why and How Corporations Use PEDR – Preliminary Findings

On Friday, I was honored to join the all-star cast – including keynoter Lisa Blomgren Amsler, Jackie Font-Guzmán, Susan Franck, Tim Hedeen, Mariana Hernandez Crespo, Jan Martinez, Jackie Nolan-Haley, Jen Reynolds, Colin Rule, Andrea Schneider, Nancy Welsh, and Maureen Weston – at St. Thomas Law School’s Symposium, Dispute System Design: Justice, Accountability and Impact. I … Continue reading Why and How Corporations Use PEDR – Preliminary Findings

How Can We Help in Major Social Conflicts, if at All?

I have gotten emails from dispute resolution colleagues asking what we, in Missouri’s dispute resolution center, might do (or might have done) to help manage the conflict at our university more constructively. For years, some folks in our DR community have noted despairingly that we aren’t engaged in major conflicts like the one that has … Continue reading How Can We Help in Major Social Conflicts, if at All?

Problems with the New York Times Series on Arbitration

Noam Ebner posted a comment on the DRLE listserv about the recent series of articles in the New York Times about arbitration.  I wrote the following comment, in part, responding to his.  I am reproducing his comment with his permission.   In my comments below, I added a paragraph which wasn’t in my listserv comment, about … Continue reading Problems with the New York Times Series on Arbitration

PEDR is Important for Culture Change in Courts

As you may know, the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System (IAALS), is a “national, independent research center dedicated to facilitating continuous improvement and advancing excellence in the American legal system.”  It is an impressive, high-powered organization based in the University of Denver. It has four major initiatives:  (1) Quality Judges (promoting … Continue reading PEDR is Important for Culture Change in Courts

Escaping Lawyers’ Prison of Fear in Litigation and Negotiation

You might like to read the cover story in the November 2015 issue of the ABA Journal, “Lawyers Shackled by Fear, Fear Not:  While Feelings of Dread May Be Endemic to the Legal Profession, They Can Be Transformed to Positive Effect,” which features my article, Escaping from Lawyers’ Prison of Fear.  (Click on the title … Continue reading Escaping Lawyers’ Prison of Fear in Litigation and Negotiation

Weinstein JAMS International Fellowship Applications Due Nov. 20

The Weinstein JAMS International Fellowship Program, inaugurated in 2008, provides opportunities for qualified individuals from outside the United States to study dispute resolution processes and practices in the U.S. to assist them in their efforts to advance the resolution of disputes in their home countries. The JAMS Foundation will approve Fellowships of up to $20,000 … Continue reading Weinstein JAMS International Fellowship Applications Due Nov. 20

YO – Listserve and Discussion about International Dispute Resolution

A message from my colleague, S.I. Strong: Dear all I’m the moderator of Young OGEMID, which is aimed at junior associates, academics and students interested in international dispute resolution.  The listserve serves a variety of purposes, but I’m writing because we’re going to be doing a virtual symposium next week on writing for publication and … Continue reading YO – Listserve and Discussion about International Dispute Resolution

Student Writing Competition on History of DR – Deadline: Nov. 9

An announcement from my colleague, S.I. Strong: Dear all I’m pleased to announce that a student writing competition is being organized in conjunction with the annual symposium convened by the Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution at the University of Missouri School of Law.  This year’s symposium is convened by Prof. Carli Conklin and … Continue reading Student Writing Competition on History of DR – Deadline: Nov. 9

Dispute Resolution Systems and the Future of Our Field

First, I suggested that trials should be considered as part of (A)DR. Now, my school publishes a symposium on judicial education in our Journal of Dispute Resolution. You might understandably wonder if we have lost our freaking minds. I submit not.  Rather, I think that this reflects an evolution of our goals and how we … Continue reading Dispute Resolution Systems and the Future of Our Field

Law Students Can Choose to Thrive or Merely Survive

Following my post summarizing Lawrence Krieger and Kennon Sheldon’s research on what makes lawyers (and law students) happy, I just saw this blog post with Krieger’s concise and practical message to students based on that research. He tells students that they can focus on extrinsic motivations, competing with other students, and try to survive in … Continue reading Law Students Can Choose to Thrive or Merely Survive