All posts by John Lande

Call for Papers for Special Issue of Negotiation and Conflict Management Research

From DFOI Donna Shestowsky: Here’s a call for papers for a special issue of Negotiation and Conflict Management Research Listen and Talk about Controversial Issues: Principles and Strategies for Difficult Conversations in 2020 and Beyond Submission Deadline: March 10, 2020 This call is for a fast turnaround special issue, driven in part by the upcoming … Continue reading Call for Papers for Special Issue of Negotiation and Conflict Management Research

Somewhere Between Reasonable and Crazy

The very touching Netflix movie, Marriage Story, provides an unusually realistic depiction of divorce dynamics. I particularly appreciate the portrayals of the spouses and their eight year-old son, reflecting the complexity of their conflicts and their ambivalences.  Both spouses are decent people – and both have their foibles.  They struggle with the tension between caring … Continue reading Somewhere Between Reasonable and Crazy

Theory of Change Symposium – Part 4

This part of the symposium includes several pieces focusing on key skills in legal and dispute resolution practice.  Lisa Amsler highlights the importance of interpersonal and process skills as technology is radically changing legal practice.  Russ Bleemer identifies deficiencies in mediators’ listening behaviors as mediation practice becomes routinized, and he encourages mediators to keep focusing … Continue reading Theory of Change Symposium – Part 4

Mangano Award Nomination Deadline – December 16

From FOI Elayne Greenberg About the Mangano Award Given annually through the generosity of esteemed dispute resolution champion Hon. Guy J. Mangano, this $5000 Award honors scholars and practitioners whose published empirical research has furthered the advancement and understanding of the values and skills of dispute resolution. Nomination Criteria You are invited to nominate research (your … Continue reading Mangano Award Nomination Deadline – December 16

Theory of Change Symposium – Part 3

Here’s the third part in the Theory of Change symposium. Perhaps not surprisingly, many of the pieces in this part focus on use of technology in DR.  As Alyson Carrel points out, technology in DR not just ODR.  So we need to recognize the broad range of ways that people can and do use technology … Continue reading Theory of Change Symposium – Part 3

Cyberweek 2019 – November 18-22

From my colleague Amy Schmitz: Cyberweek 2019, hosted by the National Center for Technology and Dispute Resolution, will take place November 18-22. We’re getting excited about Cyberweek 2019, which will have great presenters and demos, so it should be a fun week. Registration is free, so please let your students and colleagues know they can … Continue reading Cyberweek 2019 – November 18-22

The Law Can Be Hazardous to Your Health

Recently, I was invited to give a lecture at the University of Saskatchewan College of Law.  This talk grew out of my post, Legal Stress, which summarized how the law and legal system can be very stressful for everyone who comes in contact with it including parties, lawyers, law students, and even law professors.  Law … Continue reading The Law Can Be Hazardous to Your Health

President Trump’s Negotiation Skills (or Lack Thereof) – Part 6

Perceptive readers recall my series of posts about President Trump’s negotiation skills.  (Here’s a link to Part 5, which includes links to the whole collection.) This part provides an overview of Mr. Trump’s negotiation failures whereas the prior parts focused on particular negotiations.  It summarizes a Washington Post column by liberal columnist Paul Waldman.  I … Continue reading President Trump’s Negotiation Skills (or Lack Thereof) – Part 6

Theory of Change Symposium – Part 2

This second part in the Theory of Change symposium includes three pieces about legal education and two pieces about dispute resolution practice. Rebekah Gordon suggests ways that law schools can engage students’ interest in ADR.  Debra Berman argues that law schools should provide more realistic instruction about ADR by increasingly focusing on mediation advocacy and … Continue reading Theory of Change Symposium – Part 2

History of a Young Female Law Professor

The Washington Post published an account of Senator Elizabeth Warren’s career as a law professor, Elizabeth Warren Faced Sexism, Shed a Husband and Found Her Voice Teaching Law in Houston, which you might find interesting regardless of your views about her politics. The article described her academic career starting in the late 1970s.  She faced … Continue reading History of a Young Female Law Professor