What Law Firms Say and What They Actually Mean…

Now that classes have started and the interview season is upon us, it’s always interesting to examine what law firms will do to be attractive to law students.  As a creative method to demonstrate to law students that they truly are different, Halleland Lewis in Minneapolis developed an interactive website to demonstrate the questions and … Continue reading What Law Firms Say and What They Actually Mean…

Another Deadline Extended – AALS DR Section WIP Conference

Because of multiple requests, we are going to extend the submission deadline for AALS Dispute Resolution Works-in-Progress conference.  The original deadline was today at noon, but it is now extended to Monday September 15th at 6pm Pacific time.  The conference itself is scheduled for Friday (all day) and Saturday (morning), October 24th and 25th at … Continue reading Another Deadline Extended – AALS DR Section WIP Conference

Has California Answered Hall Street’s Invitation Already?

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Hall Street opinion in March 2008 made clear that the Court believes that the FAA does not provide a basis for parties to expand contractually the scope of judicial reviews of arbitral awards. But the Court specifically left open the possibility that state statutory or common law might provide a basis … Continue reading Has California Answered Hall Street’s Invitation Already?

Negotiating for Law School Classes

Apparently, law students at NYU were negotiating this fall–using Starbucks, money, and cookies–to get into certain law school classes.  Clearly, this is a fantasy for law professors “My class is so popular that one student baked 3 dozen brownies to get in!” but a nightmare for students.   As the New York Post  wrote, NYU operated without a waitlist … Continue reading Negotiating for Law School Classes

Is there a flight from arbitration?

On SSRN, Chris Drahozal and Quentin Wittrock posted an article analyzing whether franchisors are moving away from mandatory arbitration. Their abstract states: Reports of dissatisfaction with arbitration are increasingly frequent. A recent article by Eisenberg and Miller suggests that businesses are fleeing arbitration, while [a]necdotal evidence suggests that franchisors are either abandoning arbitration altogether or … Continue reading Is there a flight from arbitration?

Cercone v. Merrill Lynch (Ohio Appellate Court)

I just commented on a case from an Ohio Appellate Court where, according to adrworld.com, “the court ruled that a party’s consent to arbitrate an employment discrimination claim through the filing of a counterclaim that was later dismissed did not constitute a waiver of that party’s right to bring the same action in court where … Continue reading Cercone v. Merrill Lynch (Ohio Appellate Court)