Finding “Humanness” in Medical Malpractice Litigation

As this article describes, the Obama Administration has awarded a $3 million grant to the New York court system (of all things) in its effort to improve patient safety while lower the costs of medical malpractice litigation. The grant stems from the work of Judge Doug McKeon, who handles medical malpractice cases involving New York City hospitals. Describing his approach as “humanness,” McKeon’s “judge-directed negotiations” involve both “quietly listen[ing] to heartbroken family members vent their anger” and “mak[ing] a pointed comment to the lawyers about how the jury could react to their arguments.” In other words, he’s mediating. That’s a good thing, and it’s a good thing that the Administration is putting money into it. The only discouraging part is that this is described as an “innovation.” Hadn’t we thought of this some time ago?

5 thoughts on “Finding “Humanness” in Medical Malpractice Litigation”

  1. Yeah, this doesn’t really make sense. We should have thought of this a long time ago. And I fail to see why the court is getting extra money to do this.

  2. As this article describes, the Obama Administration has awarded a $3 million grant to the New York court system (of all things) in its effort to improve patient safety while lower the costs of medical malpractice litigation. The grant stems from the work of Judge Doug McKeon, who handles medical malpractice cases involving

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